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Thursday, 27 July 2017

WRITERS ON WRITING #97: Ursula K Le Guin


Utopia, and Dystopia, are intellectual places.  I write from passion and playfulness.  My stories are neither dire warnings nor blueprints for what we ought to do.  Most of them, I think, are comedies of human manners, reminders of the infinite variety of ways in which we always come back to pretty much the same place, and celebrations of that infinite variety by the invention of still more alternatives and possibilities… To me the important thing is not to offer any specific hope of betterment but, by offering an imagined but persuasive alternative reality, to dislodge my mind, and so the reader’s mind, from the lazy, timorous habit of thinking that the way we live now is the only way people can live.  It is that inertia that allows the institutions of injustice to continue unquestioned.
   Fantasy and science fiction in their very conception offer alternatives to the reader’s present, actual world. Young people in general welcome this kind of story because in their vigor and eagerness for experience they welcome alternatives, possibilities, change.  Having come to fear even the imagination of true change, many adults refuse all imaginative literature, priding themselves on seeing nothing beyond what they already know, or think they know.

The Wave in the Mind: Talks and Essays on the Writer, the Reader, and the Imagination (2004)


Click HERE to read the full article about US novelist URSULA K LE GUIN written by MARIA POPOVA and published on her excellent and informative website Brain Pickings.

You might also enjoy:
WRITERS ON WRITING #76: Doris Grumbach 
WRITERS ON WRITING #56: Joyce Carol Oates 
WRITERS ON WRITING #7: Glenda Adams

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